Will Modi sacrifice his strong-man ego? | Pakistan Today

Will Modi sacrifice his strong-man ego?

  • Is he ready to scrap the farm laws?

Since November 26, Indian farmers, mostly from Punjab and Haryana, have been protesting on the outskirts of chilly New Delhi.

The government tried to block their march to the country’s capital. The elderly and young farmers were brutally beaten. Water cannons were mercilessly used. Many farmers caught cold and later died. Till 17th December, 24 farmers have died, including a Sikh priest who committed suicide saying in a death note that he could not see the farmers in distress.

Many countries have vibrant Sikh communities who held peaceful demonstrations to express solidarity with their Sikh brethren at home. The government was irked at the sight of Premjit Singh Pamma among the London protesters. A union minister, Raosaheb Danve, saw China, Pakistan, and pro-khalistan people’s hand in the movement.  However he was rebuffed by Shiv Sena of Maharashtra.

The opposition parties had earlier opposed hasty enactment of farm laws. They are still supporting the protest.

The three farm bills –the Farmers Produce Trade and Commerce (Promotion and Facilitation) Bill, 2020, the Farmers (Empowerment and Protection) Agreement of Price Assurance and Farm Services Bill, 2020 and the Essential Commodities (Amendment) Bill, 2020– and the labour bills were passed by Parliament during the recent monsoon session.

Many political parties, including the long-term NDA ally Akali Dal, the Opposition Congress, Aam Aadmi Party, Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam, Trinamool Congress and Rashtriya Janata Dal, supported the nationwide strike call given by the Bharatiya Kisan Union, the All India Farmers Union, All India Kisan Sangharsh Coordination Committee (AIKSCC) and All India Kisan Mahasangh, among others.

Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal “attacked the Centre saying the farm laws have been made to ensure poll funding for the BJP and not for the benefit of the farmers”. He Ttore copies of the three farm laws during the House proceedings to protest against the controversial agricultural legislation.

Interestingly, even the farmer wing of Rashtraya Swayemsevak Sangh is also supporting the protest despite some reservations.

The government expected the movement to peter out due to severe cold and lack of food and shelter. But, it was in vain. The farmers are determined to stay put. They understand that if they disperse , they may not be able to rejoin anytime soon.  They consider it a nightmare to return to their abode empty-handed.

Aside from the death of 24 protesting farmers, thousands of farmers commit suicides each year due to financial distress. India’s Home Ministry has reported in its report titled National Crime Records Bureau’s Accidental Deaths and Suicides that 11,379 farmers died by suicide in 2016. This translates into 948 suicides every month, or 31 suicides every day. The actual figure could be higher as a large number of women who work on farms are not characterised as farmers.

According to te NCRB report, in 2019, some 10,281 people involved in farming died by suicide. Of these, 5,957 were farmers and cultivators, while 4,324 were agricultural labourers. This category accounted for 7.4 per cent of all suicides in India.

Over two-thirds of suicide victims in 2019 earned less than Rs 1,00,000 annually or below Rs 8,333 per month. This comes down to Rs 278 per day, which is sometimes less than the minimum wage rate under the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act. Only 30 per cent of the suicide victims had annual earnings in the range of Rs 100,000 to less than Rs 500,000.

At least 2000 widows of indebted farmers, who had committed suicide in the past, raised their voices against the central farm laws.

The interviewed widows wished that they abandon farming as it does not assure them of even a subsistence level of life. “The three laws brought in by the Modi government will kill us and take all our land from us. We want these bills scrapped. Farmers are already in debt and dying by suicide. If these bills are not repealed, more farmers will commit suicide.”

Protesting farmers blocked the highways connecting Delhi with Amritsar, in Punjab, and Meerut, in Uttar Pradesh, and also the one between Punjab and Haryana. In the south, traffic was affected on the Karnataka-Tamil Nadu highway due to the protests. Farmers fear the farm Bills will result in the abolition of the Minimum Support Price (MSP) |

Several US lawmakers, UK parliamentarians, Canada, Brazil, and even the UN secretary general supported agitating farmers and urged Modi to allow them to protest peacefully.

India has called the remarks by foreign leaders on protests by farmers as “ill-informed” and “unwarranted” as the matter pertained to the internal affairs of a democratic country.

Some Sikhs, settled abroad, sent the protesters several quintals of almond. Local Sikhs provided them with fruit, pulses and flour. One Galaxy Brar announced, “I had announced through social media that people can approach me for free fuel as a corpus fund has been created. People from Punjab, Rajasthan have contacted me so far. I get their fuel filled online through my BPCL card and payment is done from my side. One trolley is given 1,000 litres of fuel for coming and going, as jathas keep replacing each other.”

The massive majority of estimated 600,000 Sikhs in the UK (last census said 432,000) are of Punjabi background. Punjab is known as “the breadbasket of India” for its lush farming lands.

The agricultural wealth their generations have worked for will soon be sifted off into corporations.

“Many Sikhs support Khalistan and have advocated for it peacefully and legally for decades in the West. Being a Khalistani does not mean supporting terrorism. Issues such as India’s current treatment of farmers are just another reason there is support for Khalistan. But, the Modi government is giving a terrorist taint to the movement said Premjit Singh Pamma who participated in Sikhs’ protest in UK.

Pamma is wanted in connection with the 2010 blasts in Punjab’s Patiala and Ambala and also for the killing of an RSS man in 2009. He is also suspected to be associated with banned groups like Sikhs for Justice .

Pamma was arrested in Portugal in 2018 under a Red Corner Notice issued by the Interpol. However, India’ request for Pamma’s extradition from Portugal was turned down and he was subsequently released.

India’s Supreme Court has restrained the Modi government from implementing the farm laws until a decision. Some farmers consider it a moral victory. But others consider it a ploy as the Court has admitted a petition for ending road blockade.

Many point out that the Court is too politicized. It did nothing about the abolition of special status of Kashmir, and dabbled in religious matters like the Ramjanam Bhoomi, the triple talaq.

The protest is in a state of flux. Now even credibility of the Sureme Court is at stake. Modi’s strong man image stands shattered.

The writer is a freelance journalist, has served in the Pakistan government for 39 years and holds degrees in economics, business administration, and law. He can be reached at [email protected]



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