‘You can’t trust the Hindus’

0
52

Good advice?

 

Blaming Pakistan and appreciating India has ever been a hobby of the Bangladeshi politicians belonging to the Bangladesh Awami League

 

Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal would have stood first this week for his hilarious statement on Pakistan’s support to terrorists. In an interview with a news agency he said, “Pakistan needs to be isolated for harbouring terrorists and supporting terror acts.” Assuring Bangladesh’s support to India on the issue of tackling terror he said, “Pakistan has always harboured and supported terrorists. We feel those who support terrorism should be discouraged and isolated.” In the same interview he took India also to task in very mild words regarding the Teesta Water Sharing Treaty. He said delay in the Teesta water sharing treaty with India is giving scope to opposition parties and fundamentalist organisations like Jamat-i-Islami in flaring up anti-India passions in Bangladesh.

Blaming Pakistan and appreciating India has ever been a hobby of the Bangladeshi politicians belonging to the Bangladesh Awami League. Sheikh Hasina, the prime minister, and her political followers leave no stone unturned in defaming Pakistan and those who support Pakistan in Bangladesh. It is a very strange situation in Bangladesh that most of the people there support and favour Pakistan as a brother Islamic country but a small group of politicians; unfortunately in power; condemns Pakistan and its supporters. This group tries to find shelter under the Indian umbrella and its main objective is to do everything which pleases India. Political analysts are of the opinion that this approach and behaviour of the Awami League leaders is depriving them of the public support and in the next elections, this political party will have to face severe music in this regard. The recent statement of Bangladeshi Home Minister Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal is also an effort to please India.

The role of Pakistan in the war against terrorism and terrorists is not hidden from any eye. Pakistan is a country which has faced the worst consequences of terrorism. According to a careful analysis Pakistan’s real (inflation adjusted) GDP per capita would have grown by 177 percent during 1973 and 2008 (instead of 119 percent) in the absence of terrorist violence. Thus, the cumulative economic loss due to terrorism is around 33 percent.

‘Cost of War on Terror for Pakistan Economy in 2010-2011’ is the title of a survey analysis conducted by Pakistan’s ministry of finance. The report says, ‘During the last 10 years the direct and indirect cost of war on terror incurred by Pakistan amounted to $67.93 billion or Rs5,037 billion. The events that transpired in Afghanistan worsened the security environment in the country. After 9/11 western countries including the United States continued to impose travel ban for their citizens, investors and importers to visit Pakistan. This has affected Pakistan’s exports, prevented the inflows of foreign investment, affected the pace of the privatisation program and slowed the overall economic activity.’ In short Pakistan had to face severe losses after the terrorist attack of 9/11. But in spite of all these facts and figures, the Bangladeshi home minister says that Pakistan must be isolated for harbouring terrorists and supporting terror acts. It must have been to the knowledge of the honourable home minister that snatching river water from the neighbours and depriving them of their natural right is also a heinous act of terrorism. India is involved in this most brutal type of terrorism since long and its victim is not only Pakistan but also Bangladesh. Mr Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal must have condemned India for its water brutality when he was suggesting ‘isolation’ for Pakistan.

The role of Pakistan in the war against terrorism and terrorists is not hidden from any eye. Pakistan is a country which has faced the worst consequences of terrorism

And it is not only the water brutality; there are so many other issues which are a continuous pain in the neck for the Bangladeshi nation. These issues include construction of Farakka Barrage by India to increase the water supply in the river Hooghly commonly known as the river Ganga, the land agreement regarding sharing of enclaves between India and Bangladesh and above all the wicked Indian policy of ‘shoot-to-kill’ for the Bangladeshi trespassers on which the ‘brave’ soldiers of BSF are acting upon very honestly. It would be unjust on the part of Mr Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal, the home minister, if he does not recommend isolation for India on the basis of all these cruelties. And he must spare a few moments to go through an article published in July 2009 in the Daily Star by a very prominent Bangladeshi scholar Habibul Haque Khondker. Here are a few lines from that article, “ Once I pressed a senior Bangladeshi professional in UAE to give me a reason for India’s alleged role against the interests of Bangladesh .In a low voice he confided: You can’t trust the Hindus.”