Drone strikes lessen to all time low since 2008: CMC | Pakistan Today

Drone strikes lessen to all time low since 2008: CMC

According to data released by Conflict Monitoring Center (CMC), a remarkable decline in drone strikes in Pakistan has been observed during the year 2013. The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has carried out 27 drone strikes in Pakistan during the year, which is lowest in numbers since 2008. Drone strikes killed 181 people in Pakistan including civilians and some senior militant commanders. Since 2004, the CIA-operated drones have killed 3,306 people in 391 strikes inside Pakistan, most of them unknown suspected militants including hundreds of civilians.
During 2013, 22 drone strikes were carried out in North Waziristan killing 131 people while 83 were reportedly injured. Four strikes were witnessed in South Waziristan where 44 people were killed and 24 got injured. The CIA also extended its drone strikes beyond FATA in 2013 hitting a madrassa in Hangu district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.
At the start of the year, the CIA had intensified drone strikes and carried out six attacks in first ten days of January. However, the number of strikes was reduced to two for next three months. A strike each month was recorded in May and June. However, in July the number rose to three strikes. In August, October and December only one strike per month was reported while four strikes were reported in September and three drone strikes were reported in September and November 2013 respectively.
In 2013, Nawaz Sharif became the first Pakistani ruler who raised the issue of drone attacks at the UN General Assembly since 2004 when the CIA started its covert controversial campaign in Pakistan. Previous governments used to condemn drone attacks but ignored raising the issue at the international level. During the year, Pakistan gained some achievements at diplomatic front against drone strikes. In December 2013, UN General Assembly declared that drone strikes are violation of international law.
Mounting public pressure in Pakistan and criticism at international level has forced the powerful American agency to focus more on militant commanders and lowering collateral damage.
According to data released by Conflict Monitoring Center (CMC), a remarkable decline in drone strikes in Pakistan has been observed during the year 2013. The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has carried out 27 drone strikes in Pakistan during the year, which is lowest in numbers since 2008. Drone strikes killed 181 people in Pakistan including civilians and some senior militant commanders. Since 2004, the CIA-operated drones have killed 3,306 people in 391 strikes inside Pakistan, most of them unknown suspected militants including hundreds of civilians.
During 2013, 22 drone strikes were carried out in North Waziristan killing 131 people while 83 were reportedly injured. Four strikes were witnessed in South Waziristan where 44 people were killed and 24 got injured. The CIA also extended its drone strikes beyond FATA in 2013 hitting a madrassa in Hangu district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.
At the start of the year, the CIA had intensified drone strikes and carried out six attacks in first ten days of January. However, the number of strikes was reduced to two for next three months. A strike each month was recorded in May and June. However, in July the number rose to three strikes. In August, October and December only one strike per month was reported while four strikes were reported in September and three drone strikes were reported in September and November 2013 respectively.
In 2013, Nawaz Sharif became the first Pakistani ruler who raised the issue of drone attacks at the UN General Assembly since 2004 when the CIA started its covert controversial campaign in Pakistan. Previous governments used to condemn drone attacks but ignored raising the issue at the international level. During the year, Pakistan gained some achievements at diplomatic front against drone strikes. In December 2013, UN General Assembly declared that drone strikes are violation of international law.
Mounting public pressure in Pakistan and criticism at international level has forced the powerful American agency to focus more on militant commanders and lowering collateral damage.



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3 Comments

  1. Zafar Hayat Khan said:

    Is there a reason why Mr. Imran Khan's name is not mentioned in this article even though he alone should be credited for any action Mr Sharif took?

    • A Reader @TrSp said:

      Sadly the possibility of Mr Khan be coming the PM is there.

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