shatters Murray’s Wimbledon dream

0
67

Roger Federer won a record-equalling seventh Wimbledon title and 17th Grand Slam crown on Sunday, shattering Andy Murray’s dream of ending Britain’s 76-year wait for an All England Club men’s champion. Federer, playing in his eighth Wimbledon final and 24th Grand Slam championship match, won 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4 to join Pete Sampras and William Renshaw as a seven-time champion. The Swiss great, who has also regained the world number one ranking, is just the third man over 30 to win Wimbledon following Rod Laver in 1969 and Arthur Ashe in 1975.
Murray, 25, bidding to be the first British man since Fred Perry in 1936 to win Wimbledon, has now lost all four Grand Slam finals in which he has appeared. But in the opening exchanges of this eagerly-anticipated final, he was the stronger player, making the most of his five-year advantage as Federer looked fatigued and ragged. However, once the £80 million roof was shut in the early stages of the third set, as torrential rain bucketed down outside, the momentum shifted and Federer stormed into the ascendancy. With the Duchess of Cambridge, sister Pippa Middleton, Australian great Rod Laver, British Prime Minister David Cameron and even the Beckhams looking on from the Royal Box, it was the Briton who started the stronger.
Murray, defeated by Federer in the 2008 US Open and 2010 Australian Open finals without winning a set, broke in the first game when an uncharacteristic nervy Swiss ballooned a drive volley and that break was backed up by a hold.
Federer held and retrieved the break, shrugging off the boozy call of ‘I love you, Roger’ from a male fan in the 15,000 crowd. Murray survived two break points in the eighth game and made the most of the reprieve when he broke to lead 5-4 as Federer netted a forehand having had to take evasive action to avoid a Murray forehand missile. The Scot then wrapped up the opener on an unreturned serve — it was the first set Murray had won in his three Grand Slam finals, with Federer’s 16 unforced errors to his opponent’s five proving key.